Tag Archives: possibility

Restarting the Conversation

Over the summer, we let the ball drop.

We have spent the past three (really? has it been three?) years working with the kids in our afterschool program in the context of the Josephson Institute’s CHARACTER COUNTS program.   At times using curriculum from the Instititute, and most of the time crafting our own relatable curriculum around the six pillars (Trustworthiness, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring, and Citizenship), we’ve spent a fair amount of time engaging the children in the meaning and import of these abstract ideas.cc-bnr-6pillar

Then, for some reason… call it laziness, failure to plan, summer overwhelm, whatever… we stopped talking about the pillars this past summer.  And guess what?  The ideas and behaviors that had become a daily “given” at the site (older kids helping younger, sharing, and a sense of community) simply fell out of existence.

The beautiful thing is, now that the school year is underway, and we’re back to a more normalized (ritualized) schedule, the pillars have once again become part of the conversation.  We opened with our first “Word of the Week” (WOW) and we chose the one word that sums up what it is we’re up to as a group:  COMMUNITY.

Lo, and behold- as if a magic switch were flipped, the kids are back in the swing of things.

Or, I should say, the kids are back in the conversation.

Not a casual, one-on-one conversation, but the conversation.

The conversation is made up of all the hundreds (if not thousands) of smaller daily words, actions, and conversations between the teachers and kids (and the teachers and teachers and the kids and kids as well).

I once took a course that tantalizingly held out the maxim that “the only way to transform an organization, is to raise the level of the conversation.”  When we talk with kids and keep them in THE CONVERSATION, we keep our community in existence.  Instead of looking to find ways to make children “behave”, perhaps we should be looking for ways to raise the conversation.

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What if we could give our kids this?

This video is 16 minutes long, but worth every second spent.

Stuck In The Forest

Free Interior Design

I recently learned of an experience where a Luisa, a community citzen, who had had two children go through the world of after-school care, offered to take on a project- for free –  to organize a volunteer interior designer and coordinate donations to transform the environment of a local SAC center into “something of beauty, something that would inspire the kids and the staff each day when they came to this place.”  Now, I don’t know about you, but most after-school sites I’ve visited (and, yes, I’ll include my own on this list) tend to be a bit institutional-looking, with hand-me-down everythings, and not much going on in the arena of aesthetic interior design.  I was excited to see how this project would progress. 

Do You Want It?

While she garnered the support of the director of the site, she encountered stiff opposition from the agency’s manager.  Reasons cited for the opposition ranged from concerns with state licensing to volunteer vetting to simply “that’s not the way we’ve always done it.”  I spoke with her after her meeting with the agency manager, and felt sorry for her.  She came to this agency with a “gift” in her hand, and was turned away- and told every reason why it wouldn’t work.  I encouraged her to find another agency or program and offer it again- not every agency could be as closed-minded as this first one, right?  Or could it?

I was upset at the lack of vision of the manager. 

Do I close off possibility?

And then I got to thinking.  How many times had I, at my own site, closed off vision, taken myself out of being present to possibilities when they’re presented to me?  Just a couple weeks ago, a staff member approached me with some thoughts about rearranging our site’s daily schedule… and what was my initial reaction?  It was a huge NO.  Of course, I didn’t yell that horrid two-letter word at the requesting staff member, but I made my firm opposition clear.  Inside my head, the voices were shouting and rebelling against the idea.

Fortunately, after my change-resistant, “we’ve always done it this way” internal dialogue finally quieted, I went back to the staff member and explained my reaction, apologized for being so instantaneously inflexible, and told her that I might need some time to digest the idea, but I wanted to leave it open for discussion.

How many times do we resist any change, any suggestion that possibilities exist for transforming what exists in the now into something more inspirational?  I challenge you to find your automatic “NO” spots, listen more closesly in the coming weeks for possibilities that call to you, and let things that move and inspire you have more space at the table than the comfort of “how it’s always been done.”

As for Luisa, I hope that she finds an organization or agency that is open enough to possibility to see what she brings as a gift- not a challenge to the status quo.  Thanks for your gift, Luisa.